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If the 8 th is repealed; will UK style "Hate Laws", bans on revisionism be next?

Daigoro

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#23
Well, if shirking your national responsibilities is what you want - then the lackey free state is just the ticket.
Well if avoiding a Bosnian style civil war that would have left tens of thousands dead and reduced the Island to chaos and anarchy is 'shirking our national responsibilities',then lets keep on shirking!
 

Tadhg Gaelach

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#25
Well if avoiding a Bosnian style civil war that would have left tens of thousands dead and reduced the Island to chaos and anarchy is 'shirking our national responsibilities',then lets keep on shirking!

The "civil war" in Bosnia was caused by NATO supplying cash and weapons to the Muslim extremists.
 
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SwordOfStCatherine
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#27
Well if avoiding a Bosnian style civil war that would have left tens of thousands dead and reduced the Island to chaos and anarchy is 'shirking our national responsibilities',then lets keep on shirking!
There was that in 1920s and Mickey Collins was happy to send to guns and more up as he blowing up lads who had been strapped to mines in Kerry. Just saying.
 

TheWexfordInn

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#28

Daigoro

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#31
The "civil war" in Bosnia was caused by NATO supplying cash and weapons to the Muslim extremists.
Perhaps so,I wouldn't claim to be an expert,but I do know that if the Irish government had attempted to intervene militarily in Northern Ireland it would have had devastating consequences,for every side,they did the right thing,told the Shinners go fuck themselves,and acted to safeguard peace and democracy in the Republic!
 
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#32
There's already a good amount of "hate law" stuff on duh books but we're Irish not Germans. Unless, you make a spectacle of yourself, there's a relaxed attitude towards it all.

The concerning thing is by winning the "SSM" thing and insertin' that stuff into the constitution, all that snowflake stuff has official standing. That kind of high judicial recognition gives them alot of encouragement.
 
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SwordOfStCatherine
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#33
There's already a good amount of "hate law" stuff on duh books but we're Irish not Germans. Unless, you make a spectacle of yourself, there's a relaxed attitude towards it all.

The concerning thing is by winning the "SSM" thing and insertin' that stuff into the constitution, all that snowflake stuff has official standing. That kind of high judicial recognition gives them alot of encouragement.
Yeah but we are living in a situation where the local Ruling Elite has less and less autonomy.
 

Daigoro

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#34
Yeah but we are living in a situation where the local Ruling Elite has less and less autonomy.
Very true,we havent the authority to repair a traffic light these days without getting the goahead first from the krauts,I honestly believe the typical Fine Gael or Fianna Fail footsoldier would be happy to shut up shop as far as any more muslim immigration goes,but its not their decision to make,Sutherland,Robinson and the rest of the globalist elite have sold us down the river!
 
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#35
Yeah but we are living in a situation where the local Ruling Elite has less and less autonomy.
It's just the gards aren't that bothered and the regime itself lacks confidence to push it. There's tension between the regime and the gards like quarreling siblings but the regime knows the gards are the only barrier between them and the people if things got rough. So it wouldn't do to insist on the snowflake stuff too hard in operational matters. And we see this with the permissive attitude the regime has towards manifest corruption within the garda establishment.
 

Tadhg Gaelach

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#36
Perhaps so,I wouldn't claim to be an expert,but I do know that if the Irish government had attempted to intervene militarily in Northern Ireland it would have had devastating consequences,for every side,they did the right thing,told the Shinners go fuck themselves,and acted to safeguard peace and democracy in the Republic!

We never had democracy in the 26 counties. What we do have is a landowners and bankers régime. We have never had peace either, but a vicious and relentless class war, where the ruling class forced 50% of all Irish people born in the 26 counties to emigrate. The serial rapes carried out by the clergy on working class children and the treatment of unmarried mothers was part of this genocidal class war.
 
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SwordOfStCatherine
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#37
It's just the gards aren't that bothered and the regime itself lacks confidence to push it. There's tension between the regime and the gards like quarreling siblings but the regime knows the gards are the only barrier between them and the people if things got rough. So it wouldn't do to insist on the snowflake stuff too hard in operational matters. And we see this with the permissive attitude the regime has towards manifest corruption within the garda establishment.
I hope you are right. Anyway we will see.
 
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#38
This seems relevant to the discussion:

www.thejournal.ie/readme/aaron-mckenna-regulate-social-media-no-we-need-a-free-speech-law-750198-Jan2013/

While politicians seem to be on a quiet path to try and dampen the vigour of their critics, it is worth pointing out that in Ireland there is no unqualified right to freedom of speech.
Article 40.6.1.i of our constitution guarantees liberty for the exercise of the right of citizens to express freely their convictions and opinions. So far so good. Unfortunately it heavily qualifies the statement with a ‘however’ in that this right “shall not be used to undermine public order or morality or the authority of the State.”
The next line in the same article is where our famous blasphemy law comes from:
The publication or utterance of blasphemous, seditious, or indecent matter is an offence which shall be punishable in accordance with law.​
All of these qualifications pretty much mean that freedom of speech in Ireland is whatever the government and judiciary of the day are having themselves. What precisely does “public order” mean? What is the “morality” of the state? Or its authority? What’s seditious or indecent?
The Minister for Finance, for example, has the power under the Credit Institutions (Stabalisation) Act 2010 to take some fairly extreme financial action and ban any open discussion of the details; or even publishing that such an order or direction has been made. Days after that act was passed €3.7 billion was transferred from the state to AIB with journalists kicked out from court before the matter was discussed. Whether or not other orders have been made with your and my money at stake I can’t tell you.
Even if a concerned citizen involved in the process were to leak the details, they could not be published without severe punishment falling on the heads of those involved.
Ireland is a country where the Republic has been blighted by corruption and mismanagement at its very core; where we can hardly get adequate protections together for whistleblowers; and where the economy is in ruins – but the government can do things with your money and ban anyone from even saying it happened. I believe that instead of talking about regulation of communications, we should be opening up our own First Amendment-like rights.

We should get rid of the qualifying statements from our Constitution on freedom of speech. It’s not for the state to decide if what you or I say is undermining public morality. It’s more seditious to the security of democracy to allow politicians and civil servants to decide if what you or I are saying is seditious. Too much free speech is stifled by the person with the deeper pockets who can pay their solicitors and senior counsels to run down to the High Court.
 
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#39
Here's some recent comments from our lords and masters on the topic:

When pressed on how to best regulate social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter, he said he would be “very loathe” to bring in laws aimed at stamping out anonymous online accounts operated by paedophiles, criminals and bullies.
Varadkar insisted: “One of things we have considered as a government is appointing a digital safety commissioner.
“We have decided at the moment not to go for that but what we are asking for is for tech companies to step up to the plate and to do a bit more to protect people. “I’m always very nervous of anything that involves restrictions on freedom of speech or the Government trying to regulate the internet.”

Fianna Fail leader Micheal Martin has taken a much stronger stance on this issue.
Speaking to the Irish Sun, the Corkman said: “Governments need to work together on this.
“What’s happening is degenerative on people. The hostility and negativity on Twitter, the calling out of people, there are times when social media is becoming like a lynch mob.”
Taoiseach would be 'very nervous' about regulating social media sites

Verukar seems a little better than Martin in this respect, at least in public and at least until the EU says "jump" whereupon he and the many other traitors in the Dail will no doubt immediately ask "how high?" and then the FF/FG tag team will no doubt "work together on this" against the best interests of the citizenry.
 

Tessa

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#40
Were they not only the other day thinking of using our new social services card to access social media sites?