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Information on genetics in the Republic of Ireland?

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#21
In Rural Ireland (people don't like to admit this) there would have been quite a lot of interbreeding and this goes back very early to the beginnings of the Clan system to fairly recently to the early 20th century.
People marrying their 3rd 4th or 5th cousins was not at all uncommon.
It's still the case in the some Gaelic areas like Gweedore
I think it's the same in every sparsely populated area the world over.

It actually has its advantages.
Marrying first and second cousins over successive generations can help increase the concentration of good genes.

It's why the Ashkenazi Jews have the highest average IQ of any group.
But they're also prone to recessive genetic disorders like Tay sachs.
 
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#22
Actually it is strange that the Anglo-Irish group which are the most likable and most integrated are the descendants of New Model Army soldiers who settled here. Though they produce atavistic flair ups such as Mercurial on Politics.ie. I think you are confusing there the Anglo-Irish with the "Old English". Two different groups with two different histories.
No, the Anglo Irish.

The "Old English" were subsumed into the native Catholic population.
If you have "Fitz" in your surname, it's usually an indication of Norman (Old English) ancestry.
 
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#23
Celt.ucc.ie
For anyone that's interested this link is an absolute treasure trove of Irish historical documents.
It has everything from the Annals to Clann histories to satirical poems written by the ollamhs.
There are descriptions and travel writings of Ireland by foreigners both English and continental (some going back to the 15th century)
It's an amazing resource but takes a lot of time to go through
 
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#24
Actually Arlene Foster is ethnically more or less Irish Gaelic though the family have tried to hide it- I suspect that maybe why she goes out of her way to "prove" her "True Blue" colours. I suspect something similar is going on with Michael McIvor on the other side of the "Peace Wall".
That's interesting I never would have guessed due to her surname.
I remember years ago reading that Ken Maginnis was telling Martin McGuinness that he was of a higher status within the Clan or was more 'pure' or something like that and Martin was not amused to say the least.
 
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#25
In Rural Ireland (people don't like to admit this) there would have been quite a lot of interbreeding and this goes back very early to the beginnings of the Clan system to fairly recently to the early 20th century.
People marrying their 3rd 4th or 5th cousins was not at all uncommon.
It's still the case in the some Gaelic areas like Gweedore
Consanguinity - Wikipedia
Under Roman civil law, which early canon law of the Catholic Church followed, couples were forbidden to marry if they were within four degrees of consanguinity.[4] In the ninth century the church raised the number of prohibited degrees to seven

Consanguinity was an issue througout pagan Europe. What allowed Caesar to easily divide and conquer the Gauls, eg have tribe fight tribe, was the same thing that was undermining them being absorbed into the empire eg. revolting or rampant corruption.

CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Consanguinity
By the law of nature, it is universally conceded, marriage is prohibited between parent and child, for the reverential relation between them is recognized as incompatible with the equality of relations engendered by the bond of marriage.

The cynic in me would say the Church knew the effects, and were more interested in breaking down tribal ties, and so everyone would consider their greater family the Chritian family.
It would also have helped the Roman empire in the same way.
Because the marraige had to happen in the Church you could enforce the consanguinity rules.
The problem of going beyond 4, to 5,6,7 which they tried for a while is distance, you would have a travel a long way to find a spouse, and it became too problematic, today its very different.

Consanguinity - Wikipedia
In 1215 the Fourth Lateran Council made what they believed was a necessary change to canon law reducing the number of prohibited degrees of consanguinity from seven back to four.

Ireland didnt have these consanguinity laws until the Normans invaded,
Before that the Irish Church didnt care, and worked within the Brehon law which ended with the normans invading.

It was at this point that consanguinity rules kicked in as the Church of rome rules came into effect.
So we have been outbreeding to at least the Church rules for 800~ years.
 
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#26
In Rural Ireland (people don't like to admit this) there would have been quite a lot of interbreeding and this goes back very early to the beginnings of the Clan system to fairly recently to the early 20th century.
People marrying their 3rd 4th or 5th cousins was not at all uncommon.
It's still the case in the some Gaelic areas like Gweedore
Do you have some info on Gweedore ?

I can well imagine the rules not being applied as much in the west, furthest from Rome/Dublin and more likely to have older ways, harder to find people as its more rural etc..
The Dancing at Lughnasa - Wikipedia book is a good example of it.
There is a tension between the strict and proper behaviour demanded by the Catholic Church, voiced most stridently by the upright Kate, and the unbridled emotional paganism of the local people in the "back hills" of Donegal and in the tribal people of Uganda.
 
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#27
I do, anecdotally I know of interbreeding there (usually around 5th or so cousin and upwards) After a time It's hard to avoid in a place like that due to it's historical isolation. I would imagine a lit of it happens without the knowledge of the people involved. Not much in the last 30 or so years though