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The Russian Church persuaded Putin to save the Syrian Christians

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#3
Fair play to the Russians if so.

Francis on the other hand is an ideologue, he only cares about pushing a one world religion out of ecumenism.

Pope Francis says ‘ecumenism of blood’ is uniting Christians | CatholicHerald.co.uk
Pope Francis has said religious persecution is uniting Christians around the world – a development that the Pontiff went on to describe as an “ecumenism of blood”.
...
The Pontiff added that a “shared commitment to proclaiming the Gospel” would enable Christians to overcome “proselytism and competition”.
...
“For this to be effective, we need to stop being self-enclosed, exclusive, and bent on imposing a uniformity based on merely human calculations. Our shared commitment to proclaiming the Gospel enables us to overcome proselytism and competition in all their forms.”
In his homily, the Pope also warned that unity “will not be the fruit of subtle theoretical discussions in which each party tries to convince the other of the soundness of their opinions”.


In other words, its normal for Christians to be persucuted and they should embrace it. We have mother teresa as pope, hes a dangerous nutter.

He is kowtowing to all groups, to further some pie in the sky horseshit thats been floating around the church for the last 50 years, which just further dilutes any respect the Vatican has left, and leaves Catholics without any direction other then get fucked.


Last month in the Alive magazine there was a great column on ecumenism
Should the Catholic Church formally withdraw from ecumenism with the various Christian groups that emerged from the Protestant revolution that started in 1517?
The modern ecumenical movement began within Protestantism because there was so much division. Only after Vatican Council II did Catholic involvement take off.
But despite much optimism, the ecumenical project was unrealistic from the start, and doomed to failure. Withdrawal from it now would show respect for the principles of Protestantism, especially “sola Scriptura”.
It would mean an end to “dialogue” about dogma and morality, but we would continue friendly relations with each other. We might also cooperate on issues of common concern in society.
But even here, sadly, the area of common vision is shrinking rapidly as Protestant groups conform ever more to secularist culture.
A Catholic withdrawal, however, would remove confusion and fudge, end unrealistic hopes about unity and open the way for a new kind of relationship between the Church and other Christian individuals and groups.
What about past agreed doctrinal statements between the Catholic Church and one or other Reformation communion?
The many Protestant groups differ greatly among themselves, but in every case these agreements raise the issue of authority.
What binding authority has any Protestant group to issue or agree a doctrinal statement that requires assent from other members of the communion?
The fundamental Protestant principle, “sola Scriptura”, means that each Christian needs nothing but the Bible and what it tells him or her - there is no room for a teaching authority, Church councils, creeds, etc.
This principle sprang from, and then intensified, individualism. Each person, in a sense, became his own pope.
Sola Scriptura, of its nature, is a divisive principle, leading to ever increasing and deeper division. It radically undermines every attempt at unity.
The Reformation, as it is called, was never a unified movement that broke up. From the beginning it consisted of dozens, perhaps hundreds of anti-Catholic eruptions. Now the number is beyond counting.
Soon the leaders of these new groups became as bitterly opposed to each other as they were to the Catholic Church.
US historian Brad Gregory, in his acclaimed book The Unintended Reformation, has shown in detail how “Protestantism, as an historical and empirical reality” was never a single movement that later divided.
Rather, from its earliest days until today, ‘Protestantism’ has been “an umbrella designation of groups, churches, movements, and individuals whose only common feature is a rejection of the authority of the Roman Catholic Church,” he wrote.
Gregory explained that despite the reformers’ desires, “but as a result of their actions, beginning in the early 1520s Protestant pluralism derived directly from the Reformation’s foundational truth claim,” that Scripture alone suffices.
The pluralism and division continue to spread, subverting all attempts at Christian unity. Honestly recognising this would free the Catholic Church to more vigorously proclaim the gospel in today’s world.


In other words cut out this bollix and get back to work.
 
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Tadhg Gaelach

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#5
Shame on the Vatican.
Compare their reaction to Syria, to their reaction to Rohyinga (where the Pope travelled to, and worked hard to stop atacks on Muslims).
They did nothing to help Christians in Syria, libya and Egypt.

The Sodomite bastards in the Vatican actually welcomed the overthrow of the Libyan Jamahirya, which was the only thing protecting Libyan Christians - and Libyan blacks, and the Libyan working class.
 
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#6
An interesting religo-cultural difference; Russian Orthodox Christians associate toughness with goodness and effeminacy with wickedness while as a lot of Liberal Irish Catholics and English Protestants associate on the other hand effeminacy with goodness and toughness with being wicked. The fact is that the Russian attitude stands on significantly firmer Biblical ground than that occupied by the Liberal Westerners.