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Why do some posters care so much about Israel and Palestine?

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So what do you think the Vatican really is in the sight of God ? Not that you even believe God exist.

Currently you are just a common spiritual ignoramus.
And you are a gullible superstitious believer in a made up wacky god figure for which you have no actual evidence whatsoever

The Vatican is a system of control, a power broker, a nest of vipers who specialise in parting old ladies, fearful of their approaching demise, and other very foolish vulnerable people, from the contents of their wills by pretending there is an afterlife and a god whose work will be done using the property and money they leave. In reality it pays for hookers and blow and high living for those same Vipers.

You need to read more than just one book John! Evolve FFS
 
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And you are a gullible superstitious believer in a made up wacky god figure for which you have no actual evidence whatsoever

The Vatican is a system of control, a power broker, a nest of vipers who specialise in parting old ladies, fearful of their approaching demise, and other very foolish vulnerable people, from the contents of their wills by pretending there is an afterlife and a god whose work will be done using the property and money they leave. In reality it pays for hookers and blow and high living for those same Vipers.
Amen to your above. However, even more significantly, the Vatican is the Great Whore of the Revelation.
Vatican's perfect unique visible and verifiable fulfillment of Rev 17&18 is God given confirmation of the truth of Jesus and the NT


You need to read more than just one book John! Evolve FFS
Your lie is noted. (I've read lots of books ... and I've evolved a lot from the Atheist I was at age 25)
 

kalipa44

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Speaking about executions

“If Putin wants to survive” he had better do what Israel tells him“.

That’s the word from Ayalet Shaked, the Israeli Minister of Justice, who is famous for having advocated the extermination of Palestinian children (whom she calls “little snakes”) as well as the mothers who bear them.

Obviously the Saker is right in saying there is “Very Dangerous Escalation in Syria” happening right now. The Israelis are pulling out all the stops to make sure their Oded Yinon plan to smash up Syria into pieces doesn’t get totally derailed. And to America’s eternal shame, Trump and the US military are acting as Netanyahu’s puppets.

Russia, Syria, and Iran are winning. Israel is the big loser. No wonder Shaked is reduced to lobbing death threats at Vladimir Putin.
Good luck trying to deliver on those threats, Ayelet. You will soon discover that getting to Putin is a lot harder than slaughtering unarmed women and children.

By Kevin Barrett, Veterans Today Editor

Israeli Justice Minister threatens Putin’s life! “If Putin wants to survive, he had better do what Israel tells him“ - AWDnews
 
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Amen to your above. However, even more significantly, the Vatican is the Great Whore of the Revelation.
Vatican's perfect unique visible and verifiable fulfillment of Rev 17&18 is God given confirmation of the truth of Jesus and the NT




Your lie is noted. (I've read lots of books ... and I've evolved a lot from the Atheist I was at age 25)
You really are a one trick pony.
 
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And you are a gullible superstitious believer in a made up wacky god figure for which you have no actual evidence whatsoever

The Vatican is a system of control, a power broker, a nest of vipers who specialise in parting old ladies, fearful of their approaching demise, and other very foolish vulnerable people, from the contents of their wills by pretending there is an afterlife and a god whose work will be done using the property and money they leave. In reality it pays for hookers and blow and high living for those same Vipers.

You need to read more than just one book John! Evolve FFS
If the Vatican really is all those things, they don't seem to be doing too well at control. The church made some terrible mistakes at Vatican II, but they were converting 130,000 yanks per year before that with men like Bishop Fulton Sheen. Truth hasn't changed because of a failure of leadership. The Reformation stole the wealth of the church. Wealth which was toiled for by monks over a nine hundred year period. I don't know anyone who has left inheritance to the church.

Why does it always have to be a zero sum game? I'm right, you're wrong? That's the kind of intolerance we see so much of in this age of tolerance.

Read Willam Cobbett.
 
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If the Vatican really is all those things, they don't seem to be doing too well at control. .............
The Vatican is doing well enough at control that they are soon going to see to the delivering of coup-de-gras to the current world order.
The Vatican is the kingpin of Satan's Globalist cabal that for decades has worked to turn the "sovereign" states into 'failed states' and is now poised to finish the job . ..... thus begin the New World Order

Most people just cant get it the following truth through their heads: The American CIA serves the Vatican ....

(CIA and all the intertwined groups that comprise the American "intelligence' community)

Following is a 'tip of the iceberg' of the evidence I can proffer:

"Donovan did more to safeguard and champion the [Roman Catholic] Church than any other American, ......"


From ............... AMERICAN DEMOCRACY & THE VATICAN:
POPULATION GROWTH & NATIONAL SECURITY

By Dr. [Phd.] Stephen Mumford
From page 172
Influence of the [Roman] Catholic Hierarchy on Government Policy
[-----]
Consider the intensity of the commitment of these secret society members as "international defenders of the [Roman Catholic] Church." It is hardly a secret that one of the most important American advances in "defending the [Roman Catholic] Church" by Catholic elitists was the creation of the Central Intelligence Agency [CIA]. The activities of the CIA go far beyond intelligence gathering of an international nature.
The CIA serves as an agency through which secret "assistance" to the Holy Mother [Roman Catholic] Church can be provided by secret American society members acting as her defenders:
During the CIA's formative years, Protestants predominated...... Somehow, however, [Roman] Catholics wrested control of the CIA's covert-action section. It was no coincidence that some of the agency's more grandiose operations were in [Roman] Catholic countries of Latin America and the [Roman] Catholic regime of South Vietnam.11
For creating the Office of Strategic Services [OSS], the wartime predecessor to the CIA, and this special arrangement with the Vatican,
General William "Wild Bill" Donovan was decorated in July 1944 by Pope Pius XII with the Grand Cross of the Order of Saint Sylvester, the oldest and most prestigious of papal knighthoods. This award has been given to only one hundred other men in history, who "by feat of arms or writing or outstanding deeds have spread the faith and have safeguarded and championed the [Roman Catholic] Church."12
Donovan did more to safeguard and champion the [Roman Catholic] Church than any other American, and he was rewarded for his services with the highest [Roman] Catholic award ever received by an American. No doubt, thousands of others have striven with their deeds for similar recognition.
-END QUOTE-


AMERICAN DEMOCRACY & THE VATICAN:
POPULATION GROWTH & NATIONAL SECURITY

By Dr. [Phd.] Stephen Mumford
Library of Congress Catalog Card Number: 84-72500
Pub by........ Humanist Press PO Box 146 Amherst, NY
Available [about $10] from-
Center for Research on Population and Security
PO Box 13067
Research Triangle Park, NC 27709

also see ................. WILD BILL DONOVAN - The Last Hero
by Anthony Cave Brown ....... published by TIMES BOOKS 1982
 
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The U.S. membership of about 1,OOO-70 percent men - accounts for one tenth of the worldwide total. Nearly all are prominent in business, government or professional life and include such well-known figures as Chrysler Chairman Lee Iacocca and

Central Intelligence Agency Director William Casey.


US NEWS & WORLD REPORT And this article does not even mention the Jesuits ...
MARCH 19, 1984 PAGE 60-61

INSIDE LOOK AT THOSE ELITE RELIGIOUS GROUPS

Their ranks are small, but a handful of key societies count as members some of the most influential Americans.
While the Rev. Jerry Falwell's Moral Majority draws most of the public attention, other religious groups are quietly trying to influence the nation's elite.
Their names are unfamiliar to most Americans - the Knights of Malta, Opus Dei, Moral Re-Armament, the Christian Reconstructionists. Yet their principles, which include strict adherence to Christian values, are the guiding force in the lives of some of the most powerful people in the U.S.
Despite coming from different faiths, members share a common belief that a small number of dedicated people can indeed change the world. Still, these groups aren't without their detractors.
Outsiders often question the recruiting methods and veil of secrecy surrounding some of these organizations. Critics contend, too, that these societies are as much bastions of conservative politics as they are religious in nature.
Oldest of these groups is the Knights of Malta, a Roman Catholic organization that dates back to the time of the Crusades when members fought Moslems in the Holy Land.
With headquarters in Rome, the group is recognized by some 40 countries as the world's only landless sovereign nation. In that role the Knights mint coins, print stamps and issue passports to their diplomats. American network.
The U.S. membership of about 1,OOO-70 percent men - accounts for one tenth of the worldwide total. Nearly all are prominent in business, government or professional life and include such well-known figures as Chrysler Chairman Lee Iacocca and Central Intelligence Agency Director William Casey.
At least two U.S. senators also are members: Republicans Jeremiah Denton of Alabama and Pete Domenici of New Mexico.
Other members active in conservative politics include former Secretary of State Alexander Haig, former Treasury Secretary William Simon and columnist William F. Buckley.

The president of the Knights' American branch is J. Peter Grace, chairman of the W.R. Grace Company, which provides a national focus for the organization by including seven other Knights on its board.
The main purpose of the Knights is to honor distinguished Catholics and raise money for charity, especially hospitals. But the close personal ties among members contribute to what some observers call a potent old-boy network of influential decision makers dedicated to thwarting Communism.
The annual induction ceremony for new members at St. Patrick's Cathedral in New York City is the only function of the U.S. chapter open to nonmembers.
Because many Knights and recipients of the Orders honors have worked in or around the CIA, critics sometimes suggest a link between the two.
But members deny any connection, noting that the pattern of conservative members with overseas ties emerges naturally from the order's role as an international defender of the church.
Pope John Paul II also has praised the work of the Knights in a special proclamation, just as he has another sometimes controversial group called Opus Dei - Latin for "the work of God."

Founded in 1928 by a Spanish priest, Josemaria Escriva de Balaguer y Albas, the group's central tenet is that all human work should be done "with the greatest perfection possible" to "help shape the world in a Christian manner." Invitation only. Pledged to the goal of becoming model Catholics and following a strict regimen of prayer, worship, study and lectures, members now number more than 70,000-3,000 in the United States. Membership is by invitation only and includes some of the brightest and most dedicated Catholics.
At a time when many Catholics are open to new views and styles of worship following the Second Vatican Council in the early 1960s, Opus Dei tends to adhere strictly to traditional church teachings. It's an approach that has won favor with Pope John Paul II, who in 1982 raised the group to the status of a "personal prelature," enhancing its authority over members throughout the world.
With chapters in such cities as New York, Chicago, San Francisco and Houston, Opus Dei members include priests, married people and single people, many of whom live communally in a celibate lifestyle and donate their salaries to the organization, living only on a small allowance.
Typical members: A New Jersey sociology professor, a Boston finance executive, the president of a Chicago-area bank and a New York pathologist.
Opus Dei also seeks to influence young people through college chapters and residence centers near such universities as Columbia and Harvard. The young are urged to follow the lead of older spiritual advisers and warned about cultural activities or literature considered harmful, such as Marxist thought.
Such policies and the sheer dedication with which members are urged to follow the maxims of Opus Dei, have led detractors to compare the group to mind-controlling cults. British Cardinal Basil Hume, a liberal who has been critical of Opus Dei, has urged young people in his country to consult their parents before joining the society.
Yet Russell Shaw, an Opus Dei member with the U.S. Catholic Conference in Washington, D.C., calls these criticisms "misunderstandings that arise from the intensity of what we practice- a thorough program of character formation."
Development of character and spiritual strength also is at the heart of Moral Re-Armament, a movement initiated in Europe by an American Lutheran, Frank Buchman, in 1938. His view that people can be transformed by following simple precepts of honesty, responsibility and selflessness has been spread through word of mouth, publications and in seminars mixing advocates of Moral Re-Armament with business officials, labor leaders and politicians from warring camps. One meeting last year at the group's conference center in Caux, Switzerland, brought together leaders from Israel, Egypt and Palestinian refugee communities. Winning over prominent political leaders has been a hallmark of Moral Re-Armament since its early years, when it was supported by labor leader John Riffe, who played a historic role in the merger of the AFL-CIO, and Mary McLeod Bethune, a black educator ad advisor to President Franklin Roosevelt. Current followers include Rajmohan Gandhi, grandson of the architect of India's independence; Saidie Patterson, a leader of the women's antiwar movement in Northern Ireland, and African peace activist Alec Smith, son of former Rhodesian Prime Minister Ian Smith.
U.S. HEADQUARTERS. About three dozen full-time members based in Washington, D.C., oversee the American work of the organization on a yearly budget of $500,000. Yet the group often depends on its members to help fund its publications and arrange accommodations for Moral Re-Armament conferences.
Members sometimes call themselves "Christian revolutionaries," but British-born journalist Michael Henderson describes the group as "men and women who are working toward higher standards in public life, improved industrial and race relations and a more sensible attitude between nations. They believe that a change in society requires a change in individuals."
More outspoken and political in tone is the Christian Reconstruction Movement. It also has a spiritual father: 88 year old Philadelphia theologian Cornelius Van Til, who teaches that Christianity is a way of life, not just a style of worship. "Man must seek God's glory in every act he does," he says. From that starting point, Reconstructionists have declared war on abortion and what they regard as permissiveness and immorality in government policies and popular culture. Among the chief spokesmen for the movement are Christian thinker Francis Schaeffer, author of more than 20 books, and his son Franky, also an author and film maker. In 'A Time For Anger,' the younger Schaeffer condemns the "modern, inhuman, technological state and society." He notes that "every person of true moral principle should be prepared to stand and fight against this "brave new world."
Rather than taking this message to television in the manner of New Right preachers, another Van Til disciple, John Rushdoony, founded the Chalcedon Foundation. The California think tank is named after the medieval church council that declared godhood and manhood were united in Christ. With support from millionaire California banker Howard Ahmanson, the foundation sponsors discussions and publications aimed at shifting the intellectual tone of America toward a fundamentalist view. About 400 theologians, artists, writers, economists and politicians attended the foundation's latest conference in Sacramento.
Advocates of Reconstructionism include film actor John Quade, award-winning cinematographer Roy Wagner and California Republican State Senator Bill Richardson. Other followers are former Ashland Oil executive Otto Scott and R.E. McMaster, Jr., a top commodity expert and former economic advisor to Efrain Rio Montt, the Christian fundamentalist who headed the government of Guatemala until being overthrown in a coup last August.
Despite the strong loyalties of their members, none of these organizations expects to become as familiar as Falwell's Moral Majority, whose supporters number in the millions. Instead, the goal is personal contact with a much smaller circle of people.
Says Moral Re-Armament director Richard Ruffin:
"We believe that the most lasting changes are made privately and from within."
By JAMES MANN with KATHLEEN PHILLIPS.
Picture caption, pg.60- The Knights of Malta, below, date back to the Crusades. Modern-day Knights include former Secretary of State Alexander Haig and Chrysler's Lee Iacocca.
Picture caption, pg.61- Author Francis Schaeffer, one of the most prominent Christian Reconstructionist thinkers, addresses a recent gathering at Nyack College in New York.
-END QUOTE-
 
Joined
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Messages
320
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372
Points
63
The U.S. membership of about 1,OOO-70 percent men - accounts for one tenth of the worldwide total. Nearly all are prominent in business, government or professional life and include such well-known figures as Chrysler Chairman Lee Iacocca and

Central Intelligence Agency Director William Casey.


US NEWS & WORLD REPORT And this article does not even mention the Jesuits ...
MARCH 19, 1984 PAGE 60-61

INSIDE LOOK AT THOSE ELITE RELIGIOUS GROUPS

Their ranks are small, but a handful of key societies count as members some of the most influential Americans.
While the Rev. Jerry Falwell's Moral Majority draws most of the public attention, other religious groups are quietly trying to influence the nation's elite.
Their names are unfamiliar to most Americans - the Knights of Malta, Opus Dei, Moral Re-Armament, the Christian Reconstructionists. Yet their principles, which include strict adherence to Christian values, are the guiding force in the lives of some of the most powerful people in the U.S.
Despite coming from different faiths, members share a common belief that a small number of dedicated people can indeed change the world. Still, these groups aren't without their detractors.
Outsiders often question the recruiting methods and veil of secrecy surrounding some of these organizations. Critics contend, too, that these societies are as much bastions of conservative politics as they are religious in nature.
Oldest of these groups is the Knights of Malta, a Roman Catholic organization that dates back to the time of the Crusades when members fought Moslems in the Holy Land.
With headquarters in Rome, the group is recognized by some 40 countries as the world's only landless sovereign nation. In that role the Knights mint coins, print stamps and issue passports to their diplomats. American network.
The U.S. membership of about 1,OOO-70 percent men - accounts for one tenth of the worldwide total. Nearly all are prominent in business, government or professional life and include such well-known figures as Chrysler Chairman Lee Iacocca and Central Intelligence Agency Director William Casey.
At least two U.S. senators also are members: Republicans Jeremiah Denton of Alabama and Pete Domenici of New Mexico.
Other members active in conservative politics include former Secretary of State Alexander Haig, former Treasury Secretary William Simon and columnist William F. Buckley.

The president of the Knights' American branch is J. Peter Grace, chairman of the W.R. Grace Company, which provides a national focus for the organization by including seven other Knights on its board.
The main purpose of the Knights is to honor distinguished Catholics and raise money for charity, especially hospitals. But the close personal ties among members contribute to what some observers call a potent old-boy network of influential decision makers dedicated to thwarting Communism.
The annual induction ceremony for new members at St. Patrick's Cathedral in New York City is the only function of the U.S. chapter open to nonmembers.
Because many Knights and recipients of the Orders honors have worked in or around the CIA, critics sometimes suggest a link between the two.
But members deny any connection, noting that the pattern of conservative members with overseas ties emerges naturally from the order's role as an international defender of the church.
Pope John Paul II also has praised the work of the Knights in a special proclamation, just as he has another sometimes controversial group called Opus Dei - Latin for "the work of God."

Founded in 1928 by a Spanish priest, Josemaria Escriva de Balaguer y Albas, the group's central tenet is that all human work should be done "with the greatest perfection possible" to "help shape the world in a Christian manner." Invitation only. Pledged to the goal of becoming model Catholics and following a strict regimen of prayer, worship, study and lectures, members now number more than 70,000-3,000 in the United States. Membership is by invitation only and includes some of the brightest and most dedicated Catholics.
At a time when many Catholics are open to new views and styles of worship following the Second Vatican Council in the early 1960s, Opus Dei tends to adhere strictly to traditional church teachings. It's an approach that has won favor with Pope John Paul II, who in 1982 raised the group to the status of a "personal prelature," enhancing its authority over members throughout the world.
With chapters in such cities as New York, Chicago, San Francisco and Houston, Opus Dei members include priests, married people and single people, many of whom live communally in a celibate lifestyle and donate their salaries to the organization, living only on a small allowance.
Typical members: A New Jersey sociology professor, a Boston finance executive, the president of a Chicago-area bank and a New York pathologist.
Opus Dei also seeks to influence young people through college chapters and residence centers near such universities as Columbia and Harvard. The young are urged to follow the lead of older spiritual advisers and warned about cultural activities or literature considered harmful, such as Marxist thought.
Such policies and the sheer dedication with which members are urged to follow the maxims of Opus Dei, have led detractors to compare the group to mind-controlling cults. British Cardinal Basil Hume, a liberal who has been critical of Opus Dei, has urged young people in his country to consult their parents before joining the society.
Yet Russell Shaw, an Opus Dei member with the U.S. Catholic Conference in Washington, D.C., calls these criticisms "misunderstandings that arise from the intensity of what we practice- a thorough program of character formation."
Development of character and spiritual strength also is at the heart of Moral Re-Armament, a movement initiated in Europe by an American Lutheran, Frank Buchman, in 1938. His view that people can be transformed by following simple precepts of honesty, responsibility and selflessness has been spread through word of mouth, publications and in seminars mixing advocates of Moral Re-Armament with business officials, labor leaders and politicians from warring camps. One meeting last year at the group's conference center in Caux, Switzerland, brought together leaders from Israel, Egypt and Palestinian refugee communities. Winning over prominent political leaders has been a hallmark of Moral Re-Armament since its early years, when it was supported by labor leader John Riffe, who played a historic role in the merger of the AFL-CIO, and Mary McLeod Bethune, a black educator ad advisor to President Franklin Roosevelt. Current followers include Rajmohan Gandhi, grandson of the architect of India's independence; Saidie Patterson, a leader of the women's antiwar movement in Northern Ireland, and African peace activist Alec Smith, son of former Rhodesian Prime Minister Ian Smith.
U.S. HEADQUARTERS. About three dozen full-time members based in Washington, D.C., oversee the American work of the organization on a yearly budget of $500,000. Yet the group often depends on its members to help fund its publications and arrange accommodations for Moral Re-Armament conferences.
Members sometimes call themselves "Christian revolutionaries," but British-born journalist Michael Henderson describes the group as "men and women who are working toward higher standards in public life, improved industrial and race relations and a more sensible attitude between nations. They believe that a change in society requires a change in individuals."
More outspoken and political in tone is the Christian Reconstruction Movement. It also has a spiritual father: 88 year old Philadelphia theologian Cornelius Van Til, who teaches that Christianity is a way of life, not just a style of worship. "Man must seek God's glory in every act he does," he says. From that starting point, Reconstructionists have declared war on abortion and what they regard as permissiveness and immorality in government policies and popular culture. Among the chief spokesmen for the movement are Christian thinker Francis Schaeffer, author of more than 20 books, and his son Franky, also an author and film maker. In 'A Time For Anger,' the younger Schaeffer condemns the "modern, inhuman, technological state and society." He notes that "every person of true moral principle should be prepared to stand and fight against this "brave new world."
Rather than taking this message to television in the manner of New Right preachers, another Van Til disciple, John Rushdoony, founded the Chalcedon Foundation. The California think tank is named after the medieval church council that declared godhood and manhood were united in Christ. With support from millionaire California banker Howard Ahmanson, the foundation sponsors discussions and publications aimed at shifting the intellectual tone of America toward a fundamentalist view. About 400 theologians, artists, writers, economists and politicians attended the foundation's latest conference in Sacramento.
Advocates of Reconstructionism include film actor John Quade, award-winning cinematographer Roy Wagner and California Republican State Senator Bill Richardson. Other followers are former Ashland Oil executive Otto Scott and R.E. McMaster, Jr., a top commodity expert and former economic advisor to Efrain Rio Montt, the Christian fundamentalist who headed the government of Guatemala until being overthrown in a coup last August.
Despite the strong loyalties of their members, none of these organizations expects to become as familiar as Falwell's Moral Majority, whose supporters number in the millions. Instead, the goal is personal contact with a much smaller circle of people.
Says Moral Re-Armament director Richard Ruffin:
"We believe that the most lasting changes are made privately and from within."
By JAMES MANN with KATHLEEN PHILLIPS.
Picture caption, pg.60- The Knights of Malta, below, date back to the Crusades. Modern-day Knights include former Secretary of State Alexander Haig and Chrysler's Lee Iacocca.
Picture caption, pg.61- Author Francis Schaeffer, one of the most prominent Christian Reconstructionist thinkers, addresses a recent gathering at Nyack College in New York.
-END QUOTE-
Why on earth would I reply to that cut and paste mess? I wouldn't even read it!
 
Joined
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Messages
320
Likes
372
Points
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The U.S. membership of about 1,OOO-70 percent men - accounts for one tenth of the worldwide total. Nearly all are prominent in business, government or professional life and include such well-known figures as Chrysler Chairman Lee Iacocca and

Central Intelligence Agency Director William Casey.


US NEWS & WORLD REPORT And this article does not even mention the Jesuits ...
MARCH 19, 1984 PAGE 60-61

INSIDE LOOK AT THOSE ELITE RELIGIOUS GROUPS

Their ranks are small, but a handful of key societies count as members some of the most influential Americans.
While the Rev. Jerry Falwell's Moral Majority draws most of the public attention, other religious groups are quietly trying to influence the nation's elite.
Their names are unfamiliar to most Americans - the Knights of Malta, Opus Dei, Moral Re-Armament, the Christian Reconstructionists. Yet their principles, which include strict adherence to Christian values, are the guiding force in the lives of some of the most powerful people in the U.S.
Despite coming from different faiths, members share a common belief that a small number of dedicated people can indeed change the world. Still, these groups aren't without their detractors.
Outsiders often question the recruiting methods and veil of secrecy surrounding some of these organizations. Critics contend, too, that these societies are as much bastions of conservative politics as they are religious in nature.
Oldest of these groups is the Knights of Malta, a Roman Catholic organization that dates back to the time of the Crusades when members fought Moslems in the Holy Land.
With headquarters in Rome, the group is recognized by some 40 countries as the world's only landless sovereign nation. In that role the Knights mint coins, print stamps and issue passports to their diplomats. American network.
The U.S. membership of about 1,OOO-70 percent men - accounts for one tenth of the worldwide total. Nearly all are prominent in business, government or professional life and include such well-known figures as Chrysler Chairman Lee Iacocca and Central Intelligence Agency Director William Casey.
At least two U.S. senators also are members: Republicans Jeremiah Denton of Alabama and Pete Domenici of New Mexico.
Other members active in conservative politics include former Secretary of State Alexander Haig, former Treasury Secretary William Simon and columnist William F. Buckley.

The president of the Knights' American branch is J. Peter Grace, chairman of the W.R. Grace Company, which provides a national focus for the organization by including seven other Knights on its board.
The main purpose of the Knights is to honor distinguished Catholics and raise money for charity, especially hospitals. But the close personal ties among members contribute to what some observers call a potent old-boy network of influential decision makers dedicated to thwarting Communism.
The annual induction ceremony for new members at St. Patrick's Cathedral in New York City is the only function of the U.S. chapter open to nonmembers.
Because many Knights and recipients of the Orders honors have worked in or around the CIA, critics sometimes suggest a link between the two.
But members deny any connection, noting that the pattern of conservative members with overseas ties emerges naturally from the order's role as an international defender of the church.
Pope John Paul II also has praised the work of the Knights in a special proclamation, just as he has another sometimes controversial group called Opus Dei - Latin for "the work of God."

Founded in 1928 by a Spanish priest, Josemaria Escriva de Balaguer y Albas, the group's central tenet is that all human work should be done "with the greatest perfection possible" to "help shape the world in a Christian manner." Invitation only. Pledged to the goal of becoming model Catholics and following a strict regimen of prayer, worship, study and lectures, members now number more than 70,000-3,000 in the United States. Membership is by invitation only and includes some of the brightest and most dedicated Catholics.
At a time when many Catholics are open to new views and styles of worship following the Second Vatican Council in the early 1960s, Opus Dei tends to adhere strictly to traditional church teachings. It's an approach that has won favor with Pope John Paul II, who in 1982 raised the group to the status of a "personal prelature," enhancing its authority over members throughout the world.
With chapters in such cities as New York, Chicago, San Francisco and Houston, Opus Dei members include priests, married people and single people, many of whom live communally in a celibate lifestyle and donate their salaries to the organization, living only on a small allowance.
Typical members: A New Jersey sociology professor, a Boston finance executive, the president of a Chicago-area bank and a New York pathologist.
Opus Dei also seeks to influence young people through college chapters and residence centers near such universities as Columbia and Harvard. The young are urged to follow the lead of older spiritual advisers and warned about cultural activities or literature considered harmful, such as Marxist thought.
Such policies and the sheer dedication with which members are urged to follow the maxims of Opus Dei, have led detractors to compare the group to mind-controlling cults. British Cardinal Basil Hume, a liberal who has been critical of Opus Dei, has urged young people in his country to consult their parents before joining the society.
Yet Russell Shaw, an Opus Dei member with the U.S. Catholic Conference in Washington, D.C., calls these criticisms "misunderstandings that arise from the intensity of what we practice- a thorough program of character formation."
Development of character and spiritual strength also is at the heart of Moral Re-Armament, a movement initiated in Europe by an American Lutheran, Frank Buchman, in 1938. His view that people can be transformed by following simple precepts of honesty, responsibility and selflessness has been spread through word of mouth, publications and in seminars mixing advocates of Moral Re-Armament with business officials, labor leaders and politicians from warring camps. One meeting last year at the group's conference center in Caux, Switzerland, brought together leaders from Israel, Egypt and Palestinian refugee communities. Winning over prominent political leaders has been a hallmark of Moral Re-Armament since its early years, when it was supported by labor leader John Riffe, who played a historic role in the merger of the AFL-CIO, and Mary McLeod Bethune, a black educator ad advisor to President Franklin Roosevelt. Current followers include Rajmohan Gandhi, grandson of the architect of India's independence; Saidie Patterson, a leader of the women's antiwar movement in Northern Ireland, and African peace activist Alec Smith, son of former Rhodesian Prime Minister Ian Smith.
U.S. HEADQUARTERS. About three dozen full-time members based in Washington, D.C., oversee the American work of the organization on a yearly budget of $500,000. Yet the group often depends on its members to help fund its publications and arrange accommodations for Moral Re-Armament conferences.
Members sometimes call themselves "Christian revolutionaries," but British-born journalist Michael Henderson describes the group as "men and women who are working toward higher standards in public life, improved industrial and race relations and a more sensible attitude between nations. They believe that a change in society requires a change in individuals."
More outspoken and political in tone is the Christian Reconstruction Movement. It also has a spiritual father: 88 year old Philadelphia theologian Cornelius Van Til, who teaches that Christianity is a way of life, not just a style of worship. "Man must seek God's glory in every act he does," he says. From that starting point, Reconstructionists have declared war on abortion and what they regard as permissiveness and immorality in government policies and popular culture. Among the chief spokesmen for the movement are Christian thinker Francis Schaeffer, author of more than 20 books, and his son Franky, also an author and film maker. In 'A Time For Anger,' the younger Schaeffer condemns the "modern, inhuman, technological state and society." He notes that "every person of true moral principle should be prepared to stand and fight against this "brave new world."
Rather than taking this message to television in the manner of New Right preachers, another Van Til disciple, John Rushdoony, founded the Chalcedon Foundation. The California think tank is named after the medieval church council that declared godhood and manhood were united in Christ. With support from millionaire California banker Howard Ahmanson, the foundation sponsors discussions and publications aimed at shifting the intellectual tone of America toward a fundamentalist view. About 400 theologians, artists, writers, economists and politicians attended the foundation's latest conference in Sacramento.
Advocates of Reconstructionism include film actor John Quade, award-winning cinematographer Roy Wagner and California Republican State Senator Bill Richardson. Other followers are former Ashland Oil executive Otto Scott and R.E. McMaster, Jr., a top commodity expert and former economic advisor to Efrain Rio Montt, the Christian fundamentalist who headed the government of Guatemala until being overthrown in a coup last August.
Despite the strong loyalties of their members, none of these organizations expects to become as familiar as Falwell's Moral Majority, whose supporters number in the millions. Instead, the goal is personal contact with a much smaller circle of people.
Says Moral Re-Armament director Richard Ruffin:
"We believe that the most lasting changes are made privately and from within."
By JAMES MANN with KATHLEEN PHILLIPS.
Picture caption, pg.60- The Knights of Malta, below, date back to the Crusades. Modern-day Knights include former Secretary of State Alexander Haig and Chrysler's Lee Iacocca.
Picture caption, pg.61- Author Francis Schaeffer, one of the most prominent Christian Reconstructionist thinkers, addresses a recent gathering at Nyack College in New York.
-END QUOTE-
You're a one trick pony.
 
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There are Al Qaeda groups operating in Iran with US \ Israeli support. That is a documented fact. I'm not sure about ISIS, but usually anywhere Al Qaeda springs up you'll have ISIS soon after.
I actually sympathise with Iran. They fight Isis. They fought a stalemate with US backed Iraq, but now help their neighbors against US backed head choppers. The House of Saud backs terrorism, Iran does not.
 

Tadhg Gaelach

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I actually sympathise with Iran. They fight Isis. They fought a stalemate with US backed Iraq, but now help their neighbors against US backed head choppers. The House of Saud backs terrorism, Iran does not.

Without a doubt a chara. Iran is a force for peace and stability in the region. The Empire of Chaos sees the stabilizing force of Iran as a threat to its continuing reign of terror.